More Topics

The Israeli Unlawful Combatants Law Turns Twenty

The Israeli Unlawful Combatants Law Turns Twenty

Twenty years ago, in 2002, Israel enacted the Law on Incarceration of Unlawful Combatants (UCL or “the Law”). The UCL aimed to provide a basis in domestic legislation, in conformity with international law, for preventively detaining unlawful combatants, namely, those...

Can Starlink Satellites Be Lawfully Targeted?

Can Starlink Satellites Be Lawfully Targeted?

In an earlier post, I discussed the special attribution regime in Article VI of the Outer Space Treaty (OST) and the risk of activities of commercial actors drawing States into existing armed conflicts. This analysis stemmed from Elon Musk providing Starlink services...

A Queer Eye on the Law of Armed Conflict

A Queer Eye on the Law of Armed Conflict

Author’s note: This post reflects a presentation given at the twenty-second congress of the International Society for Military Law and the Law of War (ISMLLW) held in Palazzo Vecchio, Florence, between May 10 and 14, 2022 within a panel dedicated to gender awareness...

The Future Law of Neutrality

The Future Law of Neutrality

Editor’s note: The following post highlights a subject addressed in the Lieber Studies volume The Future Law of Armed Conflict, which was published 27 May 2022. For a general introduction to this volume, see Professor Matt Waxman’s introductory post.   Months...

Ukraine Symposium – Is the Law of Neutrality Dead?

Ukraine Symposium – Is the Law of Neutrality Dead?

The 2022 Russia-Ukraine conflict has rekindled the debate about the validity of qualified neutrality during an international armed conflict. The concept is sometimes also referred to as benevolent neutrality. Since Russia’s invasion this year, nearly 40 nations,...